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Motherboard

23 April - 4 May

23 April – 4 May 2024

hours:
Tuesday – Friday: 12pm – 7pm
Saturdays: 12pm – 4pm
admission: Free

Every feature is a straight line, a toxic slurry of motherboards creating a colonising infestation over the human form

Humanity has an inherent need for validation, manifested in the creation of reflective images of ourselves. This narcissism has powered the drive to present and reinterpret the world around us. Artists have always shown a mirror to the world, interpreting it and redefining it into a multitude of versions. Creating art is like a diary entry, where artists absorb the world around them and regurgitate it back to the viewer.

In this series, I have chosen engravings of classical statues, which have always appeared to me as a particularly narcissistic form of human presentation. Through them, we strive to see ourselves represented as the perfection of physical beauty, as actual gods.

The arrival of artificial intelligence (AI) is no different, except it is cannibalising the artists’ art. AI consumes the pantheon of art that has defined the human face and form for millennia, from ancient statues to modern photography. It regurgitates our representations of ourselves back to us, resulting in an endless mirrored hall of confection that can be fascinating and beautiful, whilst also unnerving and frightening.

My ongoing fascination with motherboards – the engine rooms of computer technology – arrives at a potent juncture in the evolution of art. In order to make my art, I need to destroy the machinery that I use to make my art. I cannibalise the very mechanics that craft the digital world, colonising antique engravings with their alien presence.

Extracted from a discarded laptop, the original motherboard component was scanned at ultra-high resolution. Multiple representations and generations were placed, layered, rotated and meticulously manoeuvred in enormous files with dozens and dozens of layers. Yet, throughout the process the motherboard never loses its purity; it is never distorted or curved. Every feature is a straight line, a toxic slurry of motherboards creating a colonising infestation over the human form.

Image 1: Served Bold, Chris Orr, pigment inks on Canson Aquarelle rag, 90 x 112cm
Image 2: Coaxius, Chris Orr, 2024, pigment inks on Canson Aquarelle rag, 52 x 67cm
Image 3: Coaxius Necropolis, Chris Orr, 2024, pigment inks on Canson Aquarelle rag, 90 x 106cm

Chris Orr is of European and Aboriginal decent. His work is an unorthodox assemblage of engravings blanketed in detritus and ephemera, most prominently the cartographic contortions of old motherboards.

Since his ‘Dolly’ works (2000), a series of haunting digital manipulations on canvas, he has held three successful shows: ‘Bone Idol’ (2015), a carnivalised confection of candified decay; ‘Conventicle’ (2019), an unorthodox assemblage of engravings blanketed in detritus and ephemera; and ‘Sacellum’ (2022), a melancholic wink at consumerism and spirituality.

In 2020, Motherboard Portal (Verde)  was acquired by the ACU Art Collection. Chris exhibited at the iconic Bakehouse Art Project (2022), was shortlisted for the Castlemaine Experimental Print Prize (2023), and the Banyule Award for Works on Paper (2019, 2021, 2023), winning its Peoples’ Choice Award 2023 with White noise.

He was shortlisted in the Geelong Acquisitive Print Award (2021, 2023), winning the prestigious Ursula Hoff Award 2023 for Served bold.

Exhibition Opening
Saturday 27th April
2:00pm – 4:00pm

Free Entry.
All Welcome.
No Booking Required.

Details

Start:
23 April
End:
4 May
Event Category:

Venue

fortyfivedownstairs gallery
45 Flinders Lane
Melbourne, Victoria 3000 Australia
+ Google Map
Phone
03 9662 9966
View Venue Website

Organiser

fortyfivedownstairs
Phone
03 9662 9966
Email
info@fortyfivedownstairs.com

Other

Artist
Chris Orr
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